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Feature image: @kinks.n.all on Instagram

Today’s #WCW shout out goes to fashion guru, Xolani Gumede.

Where do you work and what do you do there?

“I am the Fashion Editor at Essentials Magazine. I am in charge of product content creation for both our digital and print platforms, writing all fashion articles for both platforms, and conceptualising, styling our fashion editorials every month, as well as styling our cover stars.” 

kinks.n.all on Instagram

How long have you been the fashion editor at Essentials Magazine?

“I’ve been working at Essentials for a little over 3 years now.”

What are your favourite trends for winter 2019?

“I’ve been loving the over-sized camel coat trend, retro animal prints, layered necklaces worn over roll neck jumpers and anything with masculine tailoring”

What are some of the Summer 2019 trends we can look forward to?

“As we head into the warmer months, there are two seemingly opposing chains of thoughts; be bold or laid back cool. So look out for both pops of bright neon and utility inspired clothing in muted hues (like sage green). When it comes to detailing, bow accents, dainty ruffles and fringe seem to be making a comeback.”

What advice would you give a young person wanting to work at a print publication?

“My advice would be to work on your digital acumen. That may sound weird, but digital media is taking over the industry. So stay ahead of the curve by immersing yourself with all things digital. From SEO development, to thinking of yourself as more of a content producer than a print writer.”

What have your career highlights been so far?

“Oh gosh, there have been so many, but two of my highlights are traveling internationally with companies that respect and work with our magazine; and working with Chef Nti for the cover we did with her. She is truly a self-made successful business woman (her story was so inspirational).”

kinks.n.all on Instagram

How do you keep up with fashion and digital trends? Which sites or influencers do you follow?

“I’m lucky enough to be able to attend fashion shows, which are a pretty good indicator of what to look out for in terms of trends. Our local designers like Rich Mnisi, Mmuso Maxwell, and Black Coffee are a wonderful way to stay ahead of the trends and fashion curve. In terms of local influencers, I really like Palesa Mahlaba, Aqueelah Harron and of course Sarah Langa. They have individual style and a great work ethic which is inspiring to observe.” 

kinks.n.all on Instagram

What are some of the best aspects of your job?

“The free clothing of course! But seriously, I love being able to come up with new and interesting fashion concepts for every issue, and of course working with super creative photographers and makeup artists.”

Where can people find and follow you?

“You can follow me on Instagram @kinks.n.all or read my articles on our website https://www.essentials.co.za/

You have your own natural hair blog, please tell us a little bit about that. What inspired you to start it and where can we find that?

“Oh gosh, it’s not a blog as of yet… Looking at the market and the move towards Instagram and YouTube has shifted my focus. So I would like to take that focus onto my Instagram account. The natural hair journey is long and challenging one, but you can look to my Instagram page for natural hair tips and tricks that have worked for me. I’m only about 2 and a half years natural, so I’m not rushing it. I share as I learn and grow in this journey.”

Feature image source: eli_sh_ia on Instagram

There’s a whole lot more to luxury fashion than monograms and expensive price tags and this week’s woman crush, Elishia Govender educates us on exactly that.

What were you doing before starting your career in luxury fashion?

“I used to work for Rivers Church as a receptionist & volunteered there for many years.”

How long have you been working in this industry?

“I started working in 2012 for Louis Vuitton and joined Gucci in 2015. This year marks 7 years in the high luxury fashion retail environment.”

eli_sh_ia on Instagram

What has it been like working with brands that have a rich heritage yet also have  a major influence on millennials?

“Working for an Italian brand has been phenomenal. It has been nothing but a privilege to have been a part of the revolution that Allesandro Michele has made into every millennials definition of what true fashion is right now. No boundaries, gender fluid and expressive.”

If it wasn’t luxury fashion, where do think you’d be working?

“My heart will always be in outreach to underprivileged schools and kids. I am on a journey to begin an outreach to schools in rural areas where myself and a few friends of mine have decided to start an NGO where we would be able to start assisting kids through all grade with financial aid, life skills, after school projects and counselling. We aim to start bridging a major gap that we have found with many schools that are in dire need of assistance with financial aid, after school activities and life skills.”

Where do you currently work and what do you do there?

“I currently work for Gucci and I am the Department manager for the store in Johannesburg.”

What have been some of the greatest rewards of working for brands such as Gucci and Louis Vuitton?

Louis Vuitton opened a door to find my passion in the fashion industry and styling. There is so much more to the fashion world apart from just clothing. Gucci gave me a platform to put forward my experience and grow myself. I started as a sales associate and built my way up. I have been able to travel the world, visit the fashion capital and discover the design process for some of the most iconic pieces known to the brand and that has just been the start of my career. I still feel like I have just unlocked my first chapter to this amazing adventure as there is so much to still experience.

eli_sh_ia on Instagram

What have been some of the greatest challenges you’ve encountered in retail?

“My greatest challenge has been adapting to situations. Fashion evolves and it takes a lot of dedication to keep yourself well informed about competing brands , product knowledge, customer relations; these are all the pieces that get the complete puzzle together.”

What do you wish people knew about working in fashion and especially retail?

“Retail can be so rewarding, but only if you put the time and effort into it. It isn’t easy and takes so much dedication and hard work. I have worked up to 15 hours a day sometimes. I started off as just a sales associate with no idea that it could lead me to such a magical career. It took me a few good years to become the Department Manager as that position had been created in South Africa specifically for me. It taught me perseverance and sacrifice, I gave up many family events, holidays and so many special occasions to be at work. Retail hours can be a nightmare. It was so tough at first but I get to travel the world now for amazing events, pre- screenings of seasons and even all expenses paid weeks to Italy as a reward for all my hard work. From the outside, society sees retail as just a poor little sales job that someone was lucky enough to get, but to be chosen to be an ambassador for such a prestigious international brand is every girl’s dream if they have a flair for fashion. Stick to your passion and work hard at what you believe you deserve.”

eli_sh_ia on Instagram

Is working in luxury fashion as glamorous for employees as it is for the brands’ customers?

It really is a glamorous job, sometimes we do have bad experiences but it comes with working face to face with people from different walks of life. But when it’s gets good it gets really good. Meeting famous people and growing relationships with people you’d never think you’d meet in your own world is nothing but magical. It’s encouraging to meet people who have worked extremely hard to be able to afford such expensive brands and even if they don’t necessarily buy from the store we meet many people who really do admire us for the brand we represent.

From the current collections in store right now, which 2 items for men and women would you recommend as the perfect gift?

My favourite piece at the moment is Flashtrek. An amazing collection of gender fluid shoes. I love that about Gucci; fluidity of genders, no boundaries and no rules to the fashion world.

Feature image source: @chesney_williams on Instagram

Here’s a little bit about a star within the South African fashion industry that you have to know about.

What did you study?

Studied a Diploma in Fashion

Where did you study?

Spero Villioti Elite Design Academy

Can you tell us a little more about AFI PRIVE and what you do there?

AFI Privé is the In-House label for African Fashion International, it is a women’s wear brand that focuses on affordable luxury as well as once off custom made pieces for any occasion. I started in the Fastrack program (2017) and made it to top 3 in the competition. After the competition came to an end I was offered a position as one of the lead designers for the label. I have been able to design beautiful collections inspired by our African continent and showcased at African Fashion International Fashion Weeks.  

Source: @chesney_williams on Instagram
Source: @chesney_williams on Instagram

What have some of your career highlights been so far?

Designing and working for Dr Precious Moloi Motsepe who is not only one of my icons but really pushes to help grow African fashion designers and showcase what we have to offer to the world. Working closely with her is a dream come true.

Attended São Paulo Fashion week SS18

Designed with Tayla Nguskos and made a luxury dress that was showcased in New York for Fashion 4 Development.

Designed ball gowns for the Miss Sundowns 2018 contestants.

Source: @chesney_williams on Instagram

What are some of the most exciting things about being a young designer in South Africa?

Right now it is extremely exciting to be a young designer in South Africa! Africa is on the rise and more than ever as designers and creatives we are being taken serious and the world is finally recognising the amazing work we create. We have the opportunity to speak to the world and showcase our crafts and inspiration.

Source: @chesney_williams on Instagram

Is there a city that inspires you?

Marrakech Morocco! I still have not been able to go but this in one city that inspires me through and through! From the culture through to the architecture of the buildings and doors as well as there patterned tiles.

What was the inspiration behind your latest collection?

Our AW19 collection was inspired by the African wildflowers. We explored the flora under our African Sun and went to Kirstenbosch gardens which provided us with vast inspiration into colours, shapes, textures and patterns.

Where can your designs be viewed and bought?

Visit our us at : afiprive.com

or at: afi_prive

we will be having a pop up soon as well and all info will be shared soon on our Instagram handle. So watch this space!

Are there any other ventures (fashion related or otherwise) that you’re involved in?

Unfortunately can’t say yet but there is an upcoming project that I am working on.

Where can people find and follow you?

Follow me on Instagram:

@chesney_williams

Today’s #WC shout out goes to a Cape Town based make-up artist, Shinayde Meyerson. Check out her story and her handles below.

Shinayde Meyerson on Instagram

Where are you from and where do you currently live?

“I’m from Jozi and I live in ǁHui!gaeb (Cape Town)”

Cape Town or Jozi? Name one reason why.

“Jozi – it’s home”

How old are you?

“I’m turning 24”

When did you know that you wanted to become a makeup artist?

“When I fell into the industry! I really had no idea that’s where my life was headed.”

Do you freelance?

“I freelance, and I work for MAC.”

What are some of the biggest challenges that you face as independent artist?

It’s a bit of a risk for me to rely completely on freelancing.”

How do you find work?

I find work through word-of-mouth a lot, but also social media/colleagues/general networking.”

When you first started out, how and where did you learn how to charge for your services?

I was lucky enough to work with experienced, tenured artists who advised me on rates.”

What is some of the advice you wish you had received at the beginning of your career?

I wish someone told me to work on my hair game too! I focused solely on makeup for 5 years and I’m now learning more about hair and including it into my work.”

What have been some of your standout moments in your career so far?

“The first time I worked S.A Menswear independently was amazing. I felt proud to be asked to do makeup surrounded by the best of the best at 22. I’ve also been lucky enough to attend many spectacular master-classes by incredible artists like Einat Dan.”

Who would you work with 10x over if you had the choice?

“I would work with Frances Marais all the time – I really love her work-style and vibe.”

Where did you study?

“I am a self-taught makeup artist. I studied Fine Art through UNISA but didn’t finish as I was becoming very busy with working as a makeup artist, I had to make a decision that would benefit me in the future. So I chose experience. I’m currently completing a hairstyling course at Head To Toe (makeup and hairstyling school).”

 

Shinayde Meyerson on Instagram
Shinayde Meyerson on Instagram

Which type of work between editorial and events is your favourite to do?

“I love working fashion week events; I love the energy that happens backstage. But, I also love having creative freedom on shoots, or even just for fun. To be honest I’m all good as long as I’ve got a brush in my hand.”

Shinayde Meyerson on Instagram

If people want to get some tips, watch a tutorial or follow you, where can they find you?

“You can find my makeup page on Instagram @_shinayde or my Facebook page GLIT makeup artistry.”

Shinayde Meyerson on Instagram

Feature image: Celine Tshika on Instagram

First of all, if you haven’t already, go watch Jess Goes West on YouTube. You will laugh…LOUDLY.

From a girl I’ve known since age 12, Celine has always been one of the kindest, creative and most diligent friends I’ve ever had. I’ve witnessed her achieve some remarkable goals over the years and it’s ever so inspiring to watch her live out her dreams and realise her potential.

Here’s a little bit more about this week’s highly talented creative genius.

Celine Tshika on Instagram

How old are you?

24

Where are you from?

I was born in DR Congo and raised in Johannesburg

How long have you lived in the USA?

It’s been almost 2 years now

Where did you study and what did you study after high school?

I studied Civil Engineering at the University of Cape Town after high school. After that, I studied acting for film in LA.

Celine Tshika on Instagram

 

Do you believe that you’ve taken the “traditional” route (of studying) and if so, was it at all beneficial?

I did take the traditional route, yes. It was beneficial in the sense that I grew and learned a lot. It’s hard to say after the fact, since I’ve made lifelong friends from Engineering and had experiences I treasure. Although I knew I would go into acting anyway, there was a big part of me that was interested in the field. That part of me was satisfied, but I know for sure that it’s something I’d want to keep for humanitarian endeavors, rather than as a career.

What are some of the greatest things about moving from South Africa to LA?

I think it’s just knowing that this was something I’d been working towards and that I didn’t give up on it. It’s obviously exciting to be in the city where most mainstream entertainment is made!

What have been some of your scariest moments since moving?

Whew, so many! I think most of them have been since I graduated and started working. Knowing that I had to start putting myself out there if I wanted to make anything happen.

You’re the creator of the web series, Jess Goes West. What inspired the story line and how long will the series be?

It was inspired by a few ideas I had for YouTube vlog rants. I’d made one while I was studying and it was received relatively well. I thought I’d get back into it. But, I started working on a 30-minute series idea, and I realized I could marry the two and make something lower-budget and easier for a beginner writer.

It’s definitely based on a lot of the experiences I’ve had since moving here. I’ve been asked some really ridiculous questions about Africa, and I figured it was time to view Americans through the eyes of an African, instead of the other way round.

The series has 4 episodes. I do unfortunately have to take a break from filming, since I have to take a few months to sort out visa things. But I’m going to keep creating more content while I’m out of LA.

Celine Tshika on Instagram

What have been some of career highlights?

The first shoot for ‘Jess Goes West’ was definitely one of the highlights. I actually shot episode 3 first (December 2018), and the people who came through to be in that party scene were so supportive and so much fun. We laughed so much on that set, and almost all of them let me know that they were down to help out if I needed them for any other episodes. That’s actually how a lot of the characters in the classroom (episodes 1 and 4) got added.

Some cast members of Jess Goes West. Celine Tshika on Instagram

As a Jo’burg turned LA girl where are some of the most inspiring/fun places to see in LA?

Universal CityWalk definitely reminds me of Jo’burg. It has everything we like: a wonderful cinema with THE BEST recliner seats, restaurants, an entertainment area, an amusement park and shopping! I’m lucky to live quite close to it. Doing audience work was also cool- it’s great to have a seat in one of those big studios where popular shows are taped, and of course, see the celebrity hosts/judges in person. But LA is also mountainous so it has some really great hiking spots for those who are into that.

Which artists inspire you the most?

Hmm, for Americans I’d say Issa Rae. Typical, yes, but for good reason. I value especially what she said about networking across, instead of networking up, because it rang true for me. The people who showed up to my shoot, hungry to work more were critical to making the show the success it was. I’m a firm believer in all of us winning.

For South Africans, it’s Terry Pheto and Michelle Mosalakae. Terry Pheto…I’m just obsessed with her. She’s talented, gracious, gorgeous and I always try keep up with whatever work she’s doing because I know she kills every performance. Michelle is someone I’ve known about since I was in university. She’s a friend-of-a-friend, and it’s been amazing to see her go from “my friend’s friend who tells the most hilarious stories” to this huge star in the SA entertainment industry. I love her confidence, her passion, and especially the fact that she takes her work seriously. I have so much respect for her and she definitely inspires me.

Where can people find and follow your work?

My work can be found on www.jessgoeswest.com! I post updates on social media- there you’ll be notified of behind-the-scenes material that’s made available, and other recognition that the show receives.

 

Today’s #WC is a Kabelo Maaka, a phenomenal creative and business woman. Here’s her story.

How old are you?

I am 24. Turning 25 in September 🙂

Where are you from?

I am South African. I was born in Johannesburg, but my family is originally from Limpopo.

What did you study and where did you study?

So the formal name for my degree is Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Motion Picture Medium. I studied at a film school called AFDA. I did my undergrad in Cape Town and my post-grad at their Johannesburg campus. I went to AFDA specifically for animation, but because it is a film degree I also took classes in: film editing, sound design, script writing, music performance, film producing.

When I was in my fourth year I got the opportunity to attend Gobelins L’Ecole de L’Image in Paris, France. It is one of the best (if not the best) animation schools in the world. I attended their character animation summer school where I was taught by Disney veterans and people who worked on blockbuster feature films. That was surreal. It really changed my perspective on how animation could be taught! My experience studying animation at AFDA was quite disappointing. The other subjects were decent, but the animation course was poorly run and poorly supported when I was there, so being at Gobelins was a refreshing change of pace. I felt like I found people who took animation just as seriously as I did.

I also learnt a lot from using YouTube tutorials, online classes, animation books and emailing other artists that I admired online.

 

What are you currently doing for work?

Right now I wear a lot of different hats, but all within animation. This is the work I do:

  • Creative Director & Lead Animator
  • 2D Animation & Pre-production Lecturer
  • Animation Teacher & Mentor
  • Illustrator
  • Animator
  • Animation Director
  • Concept Artist
  • Story boarder

As a Creative Director and a Lead Animator I work for my company Cabblow Studios. I founded my studio in 2017 after graduating with my honours degree. We are an animation and illustration studio focused on creating original short and long form projects, commissioned work and medical animation. Medical Animation is our unique service offering, where we use animation for the medical industry – hospitals, doctors, medical aids & pharmaceuticals etc… This is a unique partnership that I have with my mother – Dr Tshepo P. Maaka. She is a medical doctor of 25 years experience. She oversees the aspects of business development and the medical content and I oversee all the creative aspects like: storytelling and animation style. Because we are a growing studio we have to share the work between us, but it is a good learning experience.

 

Cabblow on Instagram

 

What have been some of your biggest achievements in your career?

 

I feel like I only just started my career so I’m still trying to rack up my achievements, but I think I can list a few:

  • Starting my company straight after university (I’m glad I took the plunge)
  • Studying animation in France (it has opened a lot of doors to be associated with such an acclaimed school)
  • I just finished one year as an Animation Lecturer in Feb 2019, so that’s cool!
  • Getting to speak at The Cape Town International Animation Festival (and meeting so many of my industry peers for the first time)
  • Getting my first Medical Animation client towards the end of last year!
  • Creating my Gobelins Vlog Series (I get a lot of comments on YouTube and Instagram from people who say they appreciate the insight I gave them into the summer school program. A lot of people also ask for advice and encouragement because applying can seem so intimidating).
  • Gaining confidence in my art style and my way of creating animation (It’s an ongoing journey, but I’m in such a good place with that)
Cabblowstudios on Instagram

At what age did you know that you wanted to be an animator and which things in your life do you think influenced your choice?

 

I knew I wanted to be in animation from a very young age, but I didn’t know that the job title was called “Animator”. Like many others I loved animation growing up, but what I loved more than the movies and the shows was the behind the scenes on DVD releases. Because my mother was a single parent with a very demanding job we weren’t able to go out to the cinema to see movies very often, but what we did do consistently was rent out DVDs every Friday afternoon after school. My favourite part about DVDs was the behind the scenes where the animators show you their process. The director takes you through the deleted scenes and some DVDs even had demonstrations on how to draw the characters in the film. That was truly where I first learnt that animation was not just magic, but something that was created by people. I was 11 when I started saying that I wanted to be a “cartoonist”. That later became animator when I got to high school.

I think the other major influence was that I grew up as an only child. I always had to find ways to entertain myself when there weren’t any other kids around, which was often. I spent most of my time drawing and coming up with stories based on the characters that I drew – especially during school holidays. I enjoyed drawing and improving my drawing skills, but I also enjoyed creating my own characters. Although animated films have big teams, animators actually have to spend a lot of time working alone so I think I have a bit of an advantage because I’ve been doing that for most of my childhood.

 

What are your favourite animations?

Always a difficult question for an animator, but I think my favourites are:

Mulan – I really relate to Mulan as a character

The Prince of Egypt – just an exquisite film

As Told by Ginger & The Wild Thornberrys – SOLO. FEMALE. PROTAGONISTS & Nostalgia!!

Tarzan (the original 1999 release, not the recent live-action remake) – the animation & the musical storytelling.

I also really love Kubo & The Two Strings by Laika animation and I really enjoyed the recent Spiderman movie by Sony Animation. I actually got to meet one of the directors of the film – Peter Ramsey – and I congratulated him on the Oscar win at the Cape Town animation festival – so that was cool!

 

Who are some of the people who inspire you in your career?

From a business point of view. I’m inspired by independent artists online and prominent Christian figures. There are too many to name so here is the top 4:

  • My mom – she is so hardworking, determined and very creative, even though she comes from a medical background. My mom inspires me to be driven, relentless, confident and to leverage my connections! She also mentors me as I grow as a businesswoman.
  • Fran Meneses (Frannerd) – YouTuber, Illustrator, Online Store owner. I admire her drive, her vulnerability in her work and her creativity. She is such a helpful resource and she takes risks, but still lives a simple life.
  • Jason Brubaker – Independent comic book creator who left Dreamworks animation to pursue a career in self-published comics. He is open about how his faith affects his work and about his strategy for sustaining himself and his family with his work.
  • Lately Steve Harvey – the man is funny and real and his story is unexpectedly inspirational.

As an animator or artist, I’m mostly inspired by the actual finished work of an animation or illustration and not necessarily the person behind it. If I’m really inspired by a particular piece of animation I’ll look for the person who created it and probably follow their work online to learn from them.

Cabblow on Instagram

What is medical animation and how did you get into it? When did you realise that medicine and animation could work, especially for you?

Also see my answer in question 3.

My mom was the one who thought of it. She was frustrated with patients who didn’t seem to understand their medical aid cover or the procedure they were undergoing at the hospital. So she said we should combine our skills and try to solve the communication gap between patients and medical practitioners. From there Medical Animation was born. For me it’s about storytelling and communication and connecting people through animated film. So whether it’s medical animation or just regular animation it’s all the same to me. Plus all I want to be is helpful person and medical animation allows me to do that. We’ve been researching and working on Medical Animation since mid-2017.

Cabblowstudios on Instagram

 

What’s the one major piece of advice that you share with your first years and think that every 18 year old wanting to pursue a career in animation should know?

I asked my students and apparently they say I always tell them to rest, read the brief & not to be hard on themselves. I tell them to rest because animation can be very grueling even in a university context. I tell them to “read the brief” because understanding a client or a director’s instructions is a vital skill in this industry. Finally I tell them not be hard on themselves because it is very easy to fall into comparison in this line of work. This is advice that I have to tell myself as well. Apparently I always says #SorryNotSorry a lot as well. I am not apologetic when it comes to challenging them with the tasks that I give and I am not apologetic about my convictions as an artist.

I think the advice that every 18 year old should know when pursuing animation is that it is time consuming, not everyone will understand it, it can be very difficult at times, but very rewarding. Go in to animation with the determination to learn this thing no matter what!

What are some of the misconceptions that people have of young black girls working in your industry?

I’m not sure if I’ve ever encountered a misconception specifically related to young black girls working in the industry because there are so few of them in South Africa. There is a misconception though, that girls don’t watch animation or they only watch female-skewed shows. This is very untrue. Ben-10 was one of my favourite shows growing up.

 

As a story-teller, what inspires and motivates you?

As a storyteller I am inspired by people. I think people are peculiar and it’s either funny, saddening, inspiring or infuriating. I want to tell stories about all the people I observe in my everyday life. From the most outrageous to the most mundane.

Motivation is a hard one. I think I’m motivated by the need to be helpful or by a sense of frustration over a certain topic.

 

Where are some of the places people can go (physical and online) to learn more about the world of animation?

Books: The Animator’s Survival Kit, The Illusion of Life, Drawn to Life and “Art of” books

YouTube: The tutorials are endless, but I recommend animation tutorials by Toniko Pontoja & Howard Wimshurst.

 

What are some of the worst things about a job in animation?

The long working hours.

Ignorance about animation. Sometimes the nature of my work is misunderstood and so people might see what I do as frivolous or easy because they are ignorant to the intricacies of working in animation.

The overwhelming amount of ideas and inspiration and the apparent lack of time to execute them.

What are some of the biggest animation trends at the moment and how do you keep up with them?

Recently I’ve seen an increase in original animated content for video on demand services like Netflix, Hulu & Amazon Prime. I think it’s because these kinds of platforms need to appeal to a world wide market and they are doing it by providing as many niche options as possible. It’s exciting because they are hungry for original animated content, which is a great opportunity for anyone looking to find a market for their animated productions! I keep up with animation trends through news sites like – Cartoon Brew, Animation World Network and animation news blogs. In South Africa I’ve seen that more students are seeing animation as a viable career option and they are attending animation schools around the country.

You recently spoke at the Cape Town International Animation Festival (CTIAF) Yay!! Can you share a little bit of what you shared and some of the most exciting things you learned while there?

I shared about my journey getting into animation and my experience studying animation in South Africa. I also shared some thoughts comparing the experience studying in South Africa as compared to studying in France. I also got to showcase some  of my medical animation work.

One of the most exciting things was getting to use the giant 32 inch Wacom Cintiq display drawing tablet. It’s a massive screen that artists and animators use to draw directly on screen in any compatible drawing or animation software. That was fun!

Biggest lesson I learned while being at the festival was that I am a peer in this industry too. I got to attending dinner parties with other speakers and industry players and for the first time I felt like I was a peer. I felt like I was “let into the circle”. I’m not sure if that is a good or a bad thing yet, but for now I’m taking it as a good thing. Even in my own small way I am starting to make an impact in the industry.

Cabblow on Instagram

 

Which is your favourite platform to share your work?

Definitely social media. I think it’s the most accessible way to start building your own audience.

My favourite are: YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr & Webtoons. I enjoy Instagram for sharing pages from my sketchbook especially during the Inktober challenge in October. YouTube is great for sharing my animations and vlog series. I use Tumblr to host my portfolio. I don’t actively post on Tumblr. I use mostly to follow blogs that inspire me or share little tips and tricks relating to animation. Webtoons is a webcomic platform that I’ve been looking into to share a future comic idea that I have in mind.

I would love to share my work in other places as well like: an online store, at festivals, cinemas & gallery exhibitions – so that’s what I need to keep working on.

In one of your videos you mention your struggles with self-doubt. What are some of the ways you overcome self-doubt on a daily basis?

When I’m teaching I really have no time to doubt myself because I have to provide educational value to my students so I just run with my ideas – even when I’m not sure if they will work out. When I have clients I go with the idea that excites me the most and that benefits from my strengths in drawing & storytelling. I struggle the most with self-doubt in personal projects. I’m always wondering whether it’s even worth it to pursue some of my personal ideas. I’m still not sure how to overcome this. I should probably pray more and act anyway.

Where can people find and follow your work?

@cabblow – Personal profile that features my personal work and sketches

@cabblowstudio – studio profile

Cabblow Studios on YouTube

Art By Cabblow on Facebook (although I could be more active on there)

 

Cabblow on Instagram

 

As well as being a beauty editor, Martinique is also the founder of Make-up By MES, a makeup artistry business.

Here’s a little more about this Jo’burg based beauty guru.

Martinique Stevens on Instagram

How old are you?

“I am twenty five years old”

Where do you work?

“I am currently the Beauty Editor of Woman&Home magazine South Africa.

What are the 3 highlights of your job?

  • “Firstly, I have been blessed with one of the most incredible Editorial Directors. Frith Thomas is the definition of a ‘power woman’, and she is 100% my role model. She facilitates a fantastic and extremely hard working editorial team and somehow always manages to get the best out of her writers with each and every print edition.
  • Secondly, Caxton House has a very tight knit working culture, and everyone in the building is easy to get along with. This is a huge bonus when it comes to mustering up the energy to go to work everyday.
  • Thirdly, and most importantly- the biggest highlight of my job is walking up and getting to do what I love. I am a creative and every week I get to create incredible, inspiring content that speaks to real women. I am quite frankly obsessed with all things make-up, fragrance and skincare, and being a beauty editor allows me to learn more about each of these topics daily.”
Martinique Stevens on Instagram

What is the biggest lesson you learned in school/tertiary?

“A big lesson from varsity was to get my work done without procrastinating about it first- this is something I struggle with greatly, still.”

What’s the one thing you wish school and tertiary would have better prepared you for, for the working world?

“I wish that varsities made it imperative that students work while they study. The more experience you have on your CV, the better!”

Where did you go to school and what did you study?

“I went to LISOF, and I studied a Bachelor of Arts in Fashion.”

What did you major in at school and how do you all your majors play into your current job today?

“I majored in business, marketing and trend analysis.

These actually helped me hugely when it comes to my current job. It’s easy as a beauty editor to get caught up in only the editorial side of things, but my majors allowed me to think more commercially when it comes to aligning with brands and which brands I place in the magazine, so as to foster a more mutually-beneficial relationship.”

What does a typical week in the life of a Beauty Ed look like?

“A typical week for me is chaotic in the best way possible. I have to juggle attending numerous product launches, with getting my print and digital work out on time. I have to juggle a lot of deadlines, from a lot of people, so even though my working hours are 9am to 5pm, this is a rarity in reality. If it means I have to get in to work early, and leave late to get my work done, then that is what I will do, and do weekly. I also have to plan beauty shoots, should I have one to do, so my time is very limited.”

What are biggest autumn/winter ‘19 beauty trends (skin and hair) we can look forward to?

“Beauty and fashion usually work in tandem, or in polar-opposite directions. But A/W 2019, is seeing both the beauty and fashion worlds relish in re-living the 90’s. Smooth, matte skin in new comfy formulas that last all day but don’t feel cakey, plus dark chocolate lips are what’s hot. For hair, I am living for using my hair pins for more of a decorative statement, verses for practicality.”

Do you have a skin routine? If so, what is it? Do you recommend that everyone adopts one?

“Everyone’s skin as unique to them as their fingerprints are, so it’s difficult to put a routine out that everyone should follow. I’m all about encouraging a skin care routine that works best for your skin type, but for this it’s important to first establish what skin type you are.

Are you dry or oily? Does a certain product make your skin break out? Pin-point what works for you and then implement it- trendy or not.

I’m really big on non-mechanical exfoliation right now in the form of a skin type dependent acid peel. Acids sound scary, but they work to refine skin texture problems, and seriously plump and smooth, plus are great at slowly getting stubborn pigmentation to disappear.”

What’s your best skin care product right now?

“Sk.in’s Flash Boost serum. It’s got 10% vitamin C in, and has been doing wonders at reducing my pigmentation marks from old acne.”

What is the best way to pick a foundation shade?

“Make sure you are in good lighting, and swatch the shade on your cheek where you will be wearing it, and not on your hand or neck.

Definitely try before you buy, so ask the sales assistant if they have a tester in the shade you’ve swatched. Do a wear test out of the store so you can see if the shade oxidises (gets darker) on your skin after a couple hours.

Don’t be in a rush, and know your skin type.”

How can I get rid of whiteheads on my nose on a budget?

“Try a skincare product with salicylic or glycolic acid in it. L’Oreal makes these tubs of glycolic acid ‘peel pads’ that you can buy from Clicks and Dischem.”

If you were not a beauty editor, what would you be doing?

“Trend analysis and forecasting for a beauty or fashion company / brand or working in Research and Innovation for a beauty brand.”

Where can people connect with you?

“martinique_01 on Instagram!”

Martinique Stevens on Instagram

Feature Image: Anke Gabler

Meet the German South African beauty whose crowned with a golden afro and armed with killer fashion instincts- Anke Gabler, who’s also recognised under the alias of @missankeg on the Instagram. This proud Jozi girl is no stranger to our television screens, large scale runways and local magazine covers and amongst an entire list of fabulous things.

We spent some time ‘chatting’ many weeks ago as best as we possibly could in the midst of tight schedules and life’s other pressing demands. Through all the chaos however, one thing that  remains absolutely indisputable about the kind-hearted Anke, it’s that the world of fashion and Anke Gabler go together as well as sugar does with cake.

Now, if you’ve ever wanted to know more about the gorgeous cover girl who’s always on your tv screens, we’ve got you and ten insights that reveal so much more than her mysterious green eyes.

How old are you?

“I am 25”

Source: Anke Gabler

Which city were you born in and where do you currently live?

“I was born and raised in Johannesburg and still live here- it’s home.”

What is your history in fashion?

“I am a creative, and I’ve always expressed myself through fashion. I got a BA degree in the science of fashion after high school, and it gave me the knowledge and tools to analyse fashion trends and create my own garments.”

As a fashion model, what are your go to looks for castings and shoot days?

“I have two different looks for a castings and shooting. For a casting I usually dress in a simple black outfit built from a pair of black skinny jeans and a plain figure hugging t-shirt. However, on shoot days, I prefer to dress in my gym clothes because they are comfortable but most importantly they are easier to get in and out of in between look changes and when there are lunch breaks.”

Source: Anke Gabler

What’s your favourite throwback trend?

“I love how corduroy is creeping back, although I’ll admit I hated it as a child.”

Do you have a favourite accessory at the moment and if so what is it?

“I’ve never been a huge fan of accessories. But my favourite accessory and often a very underrated accessory is a belt. There are so many more options for belts other than the simple thin brown/black belt. Also it can do wonders for any woman’s waist.”

What is your favourite colour to wear now and every season?

“I love grey. It’s not too dark but has a very clean look to it.”

As a well travelled fashion girl, which country or city are you most inspired by?

“I love the romance of Italy and how it’s translated into their fashion.”

Jumpsuits, dresses or both?

“I’ll pick a dress, just because as a woman we all know the struggle of a jumpsuit when we go to the bathroom.”

Source: Anke Gabler

What is your most memorable fashion moment?

“It’s not a personal one, but a memorable moment in fashion is when Rihanna arrived at the CFDA awards covered in 230 000 Swarovski crystals, oh and a thong.”

 

 

Feature image: @allthingsnicolen on Instagram

This week, my #WCW shoutout is dedicated to an insanely talented, 24 year old Jo’burg based interior designer and founder of the blog, All Things Nicole N.

During a catch up session, I asked her to share 14 things about her life, career, fashion and some of her favourite things.

Source: @allthingsnicolen on Instagram

Where did you go to school (high school and tertiary) and what did you major in?

“I went to Hyde Park High. I studied at the Design School of Southern Africa, in Johannesburg.

I have a BA in Interior design from Vega School as well as an Art & Design certificate.”

When did you discover your love for art?

“I discovered my passion for drawing at a young age. I was more into fashion design though until my late teens when I discovered my love for interior. The love for design is something which I inherited from my mother who is also a creative. She studied graphic design and now works as a corporate fashion designer.”

A typical day as an interior designer looks like?

“First, a daily dose of morning matcha latte followed by a dash to the office to check emails and write up a to-do list for myself. My team normally holds a weekly meeting to update all members on each project’s status, after which I sit down and begin my design process.

I bounce between multiple projects doing 3D modelling, putting materials together, or sending drawings out to special fabricators.”

Three things you love and cannot live or work without?

“My laptop, journal & phone in that order. I sound like a workaholic but I love what I do and would not change anything. I eat and breath design.”

Which workspaces around the city inspire you the most?

“Mesh is an amazing workspace and I of course cannot get enough of its design. I also love Bloom, a coffee shop and workspace based in Parkhurst. I love working in creative environments, they fuel me to work harder.”

Do you have a favourite interior trend right now and if so what is it?

“My fave trend at the moment is greenery, reflecting the green abundance.”

What are 4  interior trends we can expect to see in 2019?

“Terrazzo flooring, greenery, key decorative items and slatting.”

As a creative, what is your biggest fear and how do you overcome it?

“Two fears. Firstly, running out of ideas and always having to keep up with trends. I overcome these fears by listening and subscribing to design and architecture podcasts and really taking each day as it comes.”

What are some of the biggest challenges that you as a South African creative face?

“The competition- there’ll always be competition.”

What advice would you give your 18 year old self?

“Hmmm, I would say to my 18 year old self that everything happens for a reason and life is a journey. You will make mistakes, which you will usually learn from. After a fall, dust yourself off and stand strong to defeat any challenges that come your way.”

Who inspires you to keep pushing?

“I have several role models. Most of them are entrepreneurial women who are self-made and able to have a healthy family life. Of course, I deeply admire my parents, without them I wouldn’t be who I am today. Design-wise, I really admire the work of Dara Huang and Zaha Hadid.”

Since your first love is fashion, tell us where you shop?

“My favourite places to shop are Cotton On, Designer Warehouse, Style Alert (they are on Instagram) and for interior stuff I would say every shop in Kramerville.”

Where are your favourite vacation destinations?

“Bali and Australia. These are the only places which I’ve travelled to and both countries have their own unique architecture and style. I would love to go to Barcelona to see the Sagrada Familia Cathedral as well as the Hagia Sophia Cathedral which is based in Istanbul.”

Lastly, where on the entire world wide web can people find you?

“People can find me on Insta @Allthingsnicolen and my blog All things Nicole N.”

 

Is dedicated my grandmother, Bertha Sizakele Msengana, who is my mom’s mother and the only biological grandparent I’ve known.

She would have been 105 this year on the 7th of July.

I was 16 years old when she passed away and although I was a few years away from adulthood, I didn’t fully understand the concept of death or what her absence would mean for our family.

I do remember my grandmother as the most loving, gentle, strong, extremely decisive, faithful and faith-filled woman in our lives. I only have a few memories of my visits to her house because there was something so powerfully soothing about her home that knocked me out almost every single time.

Last week, while cleaning up, I  came across a picture of the younger version of her that I wish I had known. My mother tells me that this picture was captured during a time where she was working in a clothing factory by day and running her curtain making business by night. From what my mom shares, my grandmother had an incredible work ethic and the best sense of style in all our family.

My grandmother on the left with a colleague.

As I look back to the time I had with my grandmother, I wish my younger self was better at asking her more insightful questions about her life, what she loved, her career in fashion and her entrepreneurial ventures.

Although, I will never get all my questions answered about her, I am grateful for what my grandmother has left behind in spirit, in memory and of course the dresses and accessories she hand made for me and left for us. I’m grateful that because of her, I had the courage to pursue a career in fashion.

I’m eternally grateful for such a wonderful example.